FAQs

FAQs

• What is an RPT?
• How often should I tune my piano?
• Are machines or ears better tuners?
• What can be done if my piano is hard to play?
• My piano was just tuned but still doesn’t sound good. Why?
• Does my piano need a humidifier?
• Can I place my piano near an outside wall?

What is an RPT?

RPT stands for Registered Piano Technician. The Piano Technicians Guild (PTG) is our national regulating organization dedicated to advancing skills and abilities of piano tuners. The PTG has set up a rigorous testing procedure to ensure that tuners can properly tune, regulate, and repair. The testing is so detailed that the PTG gives its testees 4 years to complete it. Currently, fewer than 3,000 tuners have successfully passed the exams worldwide. Someone with the letters “RPT” after his name knows what he’s doing.

How often should I tune my piano?

This depends on myriad factors…environment, the player’s/listerner’s ear, quality of the piano, how much it’s played, etc. I service some pianos that required weekly tunings, and I work on others that last 5 years. We can discuss what’s best for you.

Are machines or ears better tuners?

An experienced ear is better, because every piano is different. But if used properly, tuning machines have their benefits. I tuned solely by ear for over 10 years before adding a machine to my repertoire. Now I employ both, using the machine to quickly get the tuning pitch close, then using my ears as the final authority to verify what the machine has said.

What can be done if my piano is hard to play?

Recent discoveries about keybalancing now allow technicians to adjust the piano action so that the keys play consistently and with the pressure you desire. See “Keybalancing” under “Other Services” for more information.

My piano was just tuned but still doesn’t sound good. Why?

How a piano sounds is a subjective thing; one person can like it, while another may not. Fortunately, I can adjust the sound of your piano with what we call “voicing.” This involves hardening or softening your piano hammers to make the sound brighter or mellower.

Does my piano need a humidifier?

Pianos really LIKE piano humidifier systems, but they don’t necessarily REQUIRE one. The Colorado altitude and erratic weather can greatly affect the organic wood components of pianos. Basically, newer pianos eventually adjust to Colorado, but older pianos that have lived in humid conditions may not survive without assistance. The Dampp-Chaser Corporation provides the best systems to safeguard against soundboard cracking and tunings that won’t hold. As one of only a few hundred tuners who has been tested and certified to install their systems, I can help you determine what your piano needs.

Can I place my piano near an outside wall?

Sure, no problem! This idea came from the days when houses weren’t insulated properly. Pianos nowadays do just fine as long as they’re not in direct sunlight and no air is blowing on them (this includes intake vents). If you have any doubts about your piano’s placement, feel free to contact me.





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